Worth a read: Annotating public fungal ITS sequences from the built environment

Definitely worth checking this out. Recent molecular studies have identified substantial fungal diversity in indoor environments. Fungi and fungal particles have been linked to a range of potentially unwanted effects in the built environment, including asthma, decay of building materials, and food spoilage. The study of the built mycobiome is hampered by a number of …

Great summary of the state of studies of “Microbiomes of Indoor Environments” studies

There is a really nice new paper out in mSystems (full disclosure – I am on the Board of Editors of the journal).  The paper is from Brent Stephens and sums up a recent presentation of his.  See  What Have We Learned about the Microbiomes of Indoor Environments? Abstract: The advent and application of high-throughput …

Reflections on BioBE’s first Microbiome Science Wikipedia Edit-a-Thon

The Biology & Built Environment Center hosted a Microbiome Science Wikipedia Edit-a-Thon on May 27th, 2016 at the University of Oregon. You can view the MeetUp page for this event here. The objective of this event was to facilitate the contribution of microbiome science edits & topics to a globally-used, public knowledge resource (Wikipedia). We …

Course Materials: Human Health and the Design of the Urban Microbiome

This last winter, Gwynne Mhuireach at the University of Oregon taught a really interesting course entitled “Human Health and the Design of the Urban Microbiome”.  She posted a description of the final “design charrette” here on microBEnet awhile back.  I just asked her if she’d be willing to share her course materials for others interested …

A Portrait of a Building and its External Inhabitants

Imagine a city skyline — what do you see?  Skyscraper peaks, metallic sheens, sand-colored stones, rusty brickreds, dirty white plaster, glinting windows?  That is a lot of surface area!  I am curious about what can be eking out a living on all of these different surfaces, and how it might be contributing to urban ecosystems. In …

Twitter chat on “Microbiology of Built Environments” AAM report Thu May 19 10-11 AM EST

There will be a Twitter chat on Thursday of relevance. Thursday May 19 10-11 AM EST Run by @ASMicrobiology. Follow this hashtag #ASMChats   Twitter chat Thu 10-11 AM EST run by @ASMicrobiology re: AAM report on Microbes & Built Environment https://t.co/UgzrheJcWM #ASMChats – Jonathan Eisen (@phylogenomics) May 17, 2016 And an upcoming twitter chat …

FAQ on Microbiology of Built Environments from the American Academy of Microbiology

There is a report out from the American Academy of Microbiology that is based on the “Microbiology of the Built Environment” colloquium they hosted in September 2015.  The report summary is below: Built environments are the structures that humans create to shelter from the outdoors and provide spaces for living, working, playing, and getting places. …

MoBE Early Career Workshop

Last week, Melissa Dsouza and Jack Gilbert at the University of Chicago hosted a Sloan sponsored MoBE Early Career Workshop. I had the pleasure of attending this well organized event and was inspired by this highly intelligent and motivated group of scientists. The future for the MoBE is bright indeed if these scientists are able to find jobs …

Videos of talks from “Microbiomes of the Built Environment: From Research to Application”

On April 11 there was a meeting in Washington DC that was part of an effort from a new study being conducted by the National Academies of Science, Medicine, and Engineering on “Microbiomes of the Built Environment”.  Videos and slides from the meeting have now been posted.  I have compiled them below. In addition, I …